Monday, February 28, 2011

How Deep Could USPS Regional Management Cuts Be?

In a previous post, I noted that the Postal Service plans to announce a cut around non-union 7,500 employees on March 25.   In all likelihood, a cut of that magnitude would involve a cut in the number of district and area offices along the line of the reductions suggested by the USPS - Office of Inspector General.

It is possible that the USPS - OIG may have underestimated the number of cuts in district and area offices that the Postal Service could cut and still manage the business effectively. Larger cuts would come if the Postal Service was as aggressive as United Parcel Service was in 2010 in cutting levels of management.

In 2010, United Parcel Service closed 26 of its 46 district headquarters offices and two of its five region headquarters offices.    For the Postal Service, similar cuts would eliminate 42 district offices and between two and four area offices beyond the one already eliminated this year,.

As far as job cuts, the reduction in management allowed United Parcel Service to reduce its workforce by2.7% to about 330,600 employees.  This is a cut of over 9,100 employees.  Most of the job cuts were management and non-union employees, as volume growth limited efforts to reduce the number of delivery drivers, package sorters, and over-the-road truck drivers.   A 2.7% cut in Postal Service employees would cut twice as many employees as are expected on March 25.

11 comments:

Anonymous said...

It's interesting that UPS with 336,000 employees managed to deliver 1.1 billion packages in 2010. The Postal Service, with about 600,000 employees, delivered about 170 billion pieces of mail. USPS doesn't look so bad when compared that way, does it?

Anonymous said...

I'm absolutely in favor of cutting 15,000 management positions in the USPS...

Anonymous said...

"FIRE ALL THE STUPIDVISORS & PAWNMASTERS " !!!!!!!!!!!!! OUR CUSTOMERS DESERVE BETTER! THE LETTER CARRIERS ARE BULLWHIPED DAILY !!!!!

Anonymous said...

Well over due to cut top management positions. Of course they will only "re-position" them. I say move them to the bottom and put them to doing "real" work. Like mail processing and carrying. Find out what real work is all about. Earn your keep.

Of course their term of non-union means all TE's and casuals.

Anonymous said...

Fact time! TWO EAS EMPLOYEES IS NOT COST EFFECTIVE DOING STREET OBSERVATIONS!!! THE REPLY I GOT ONE READS THE GPS AND THE OTHER DRIVES! WTF! BACK TO THE CRAFT OR HERE IS YOUR REMOVAL.

Anonymous said...

OVERBLOATED AND TOP HEAVEY FOR OVER 50 YEARS... CRAFT WILL GET THE JOB DONE AS USUAL ON A DAILY BASIS WITHOUT THESE OVERPAID MICRO MANAGERS ...

Anonymous said...

The bosses HAVE been in the craft before. Why did they chase management jobs? Because it was HARD WORK THAT THEY DIDN'T LIKE DOING SO THEY WANTED TO WACH IT INSTEAD!!!!

Anonymous said...

Maybe the USPS wouldn't need so many supervisors if the Letter Carriers delivered the mail correctly. I cannot tell you how many phone calls I get from customers due to mis-deliveries. Letter carriers are NOT bullwhipped daily - they act like children who need to be monitored every minute!

Anonymous said...

We get the mail delivered, despite management.

postal1217 said...

If management knew how to manage, rather than bully, craft employees would be much more effective in carrying out their duties.

postal1217 said...

If the management at the USPS would be better trained as to how to get the most out of their employees, instead of the management style that exist today, the USPS would not be in the trouble its in now. They have the most unqualified, under-educated, misinformed management of any company I've ever worked for.